captain-snark:

If you have a cool idea for a tv show or a movie a book or ANYTHING really that involves killing off a lady to send your main white boy off on MANPAIN filled adventures you could also try literally ANYTHING else!

this has been a PSA

absentlyabbie:

thetrenchcoatofcastiel:

yinx1:

absentlyabbie:

chriskaevil:

DC is being all gritty and “realistic” and Marvel just had a movie where the galaxy is saved by a dance-off and the power of friendship

And neither one of them can imagine a world either gritty and realistic enough or fun and fantastic enough in which a woman or a person of color is the hero.

This^

don’t get me wrong, i totally agree with you guys, but two main characters in Guardians were women, one of which was a poc…just sayin’.

Gamora was a main character; Nebula was a supporting villain role.

And please do not suggest that we should be satisfied with two women being given supporting speaking roles in yet another film unabashedly centered on yet another white male.

We are not merely the supporting and background characters in the lives of men. Is it really so astonishing we’d like to see that truth reflected on screen?

And further, while Zoe Saldana being a woman of color and playing Gamora is absolutely important, it is not the same as or an acceptable substitute for an actual woman of color, a human woman of color who looks like actual human women of color, being prominently visible and fulfilling a title role in their film canon.

What exactly does it say, that people of color should be pacified with being cast as actual aliens? That’s supposed to be good enough? Green’s as good as a black woman, or a brown woman? They are not equivalent. It is not enough. We shouldn’t have to settle for near-representation.

feminally:

yourscientistfriend:

Labor Day 2014
In Ferguson
Credit to the young man that I listed above.

Labor Day in Ferguson.

bizzarostormy:

just listen shhhh no questions

skeletonmeme:

bout to jump a fucboy

skeletonmeme:

bout to jump a fucboy

the-sharpie-klepto:

childishflamingo:

my favorite thing in stories is when the antagonist doesn’t die, but instead they realize they were being kind of a stupid dick (maybe because the protagonist saved them or something) and then they have to kind of awkwardly tag along with the heroes in order to make up for their mistakes and gradually become slightly less evil

image

bananasuke:

some-call-me-quint:

Let’s just take every cover ever and add that “Featuring Dante from Devil May Cry” sticker on it and watch as it becomes 100% better

image

skarchomp:

snowtorch:

@dril la @dril

image

v-d-i-a:

Colored the shield knight lineart from yesterday.

incidentalcomics:

The Shape of Ideas

sushinfood:

ablubluh:

i feel like this was the only real way to respond to this prompt

Still the best thing around.

thebluelip-blondie:

isharedfoundlove:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn


OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).

ANYWAY.

Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.

On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.

Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.

After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.

Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.

And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS!!!

Let me hammer this point down. Slaves running away from plantions fighting for the Union army devastated plantations in terms of labor which weaken the south’s economy and immaculately leaded to the South losing the war. And if it was for Robert Smalls convincing Abraham Lincoln to allow former slaves to fight in the Union army slavery might have not have been abolished.

This man Robert Smalls was the man that ended slavery and we never learned his name in school. I heard about him from an article on cracked.com